Our mission is to share the conversation about chemicals
in everyday products found on the grocery shelves that contribute
to breast cancer; empowering women to make safer choices to protect
their breasts during the most vulnerable periods of their lives.

Protect Our Breasts

1 in 8

Breast cancer is a disease that touches the lives of many. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in the course of their lifetime.

everyday exposure

Research shows that exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and carcinogens can lead to a breast cancer diagnosis later in life.

windows of susceptibility

Up through a woman’s first full-term pregnancy is a time when women are particularly vulnerable to these harmful chemicals. It is up to us to stop breast cancer before it starts.

Protect Our Breasts

Are you aware of phthalate exposure and its effects on male reproductive development? One of the main EDCs linked to men’s reproductive development issues is phthalates. Phthalates are often found in plastics, especially in plastic food packaging and in personal care product ingredients.

One August 2020 literature review evaluated existing research links between maternal exposure to phthalates and fetal health (Qian et. al, 2020) and noted significant links between maternal exposure and male reproductive development. Exposure to phthalates is particularly linked to abnormal reproductive development in male fetuses. This paper highlights how mothers’ exposures to chemicals of concern, such as phthalates, can lead to adverse health effects on their future sons. One of the main adverse health effects that is associated with phthalate exposure is Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome (TDS). This condition is characterized by a variety of symptoms including cryptorchidism (undescended testes), hypospadias (abnormal urethra opening), low sperm count, and an increased risk of testicular cancer.
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The results from the review paper emphasize how every small choice we make to decrease our exposure to chemicals of concern, such as phthalates, increases our ability to protect ourselves and future generations to come. Be sure to follow POB for more info and tips on how you can reduce your exposure to chemicals of concern!
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2 weeks ago

Protect Our Breasts

Are you aware of chlorpyrifos and men’s health? New research finds that chlorpyrifos, a commonly used pesticide, has harmful effects on male reproductive health- specifically sperm count. Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a pesticide commonly used on cotton, corn, almonds, and various fruits like bananas, oranges, and apples. A new study found that male rats treated with CPF demonstrated epigenetic changes and significantly higher rates of sperm malformation, leading to lower sperm counts.
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Epigenetic changes affect the way genes are expressed without changing the actual DNA sequence. Methylation is an example of an epigenetic change that has a silencing effect on a region of DNA, like an off switch for a light bulb. Although the DNA still has the same instructions for making a particular protein, it is not being made. It has simply been turned off. Epigenetic changes like DNA methylation can lower sperm count by turning off certain genes responsible for directing sperm formation. Men’s exposure to CPF is harmful because DNA methylation can increase sperm malformation, leading to lower sperm count and decreased fertility.
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Exposure can occur from contact with the skin or eyes, inhalation, or from eating products treated with the pesticide, so the most important way to avoid CPF exposure is to choose organic! Organic certification ensures that synthetic pesticides like CPF are not used. Look for the #9 at the beginning of the barcode on fresh produce to ensure it’s organic. Be sure to follow POB and like our page for more information on the latest science and how you can reduce your exposure to chemicals of concern!
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3 weeks ago

Protect Our Breasts

Are you aware of phthalate exposure and men’s fertility? One of the main EDCs linked to men’s reproductive health issues is phthalates. Phthalates are often found in plastics, personal care products such as body washes, and products that contain fragrance. One of the most commonly used phthalates, DEHP, which is found in a variety of plastics and food packaging, has been overwhelmingly linked to a wide variety of men’s health issues.

A May 2020 literature review found numerous studies establishing that exposure to DEHP may lead to impaired testicular function through epigenetic changes in the sperm. Chemicals can cause changes in how genes are expressed. This is known as epigenetics. These changes which occur in the sperm can be passed from parent to child in-utero (in the womb). This, in turn, leads to abnormal reproductive development and health issues later in life. This reinforces the importance of reducing chemical exposure for not only women, but men as well to protect this and future generations. Reducing exposure to chemicals of concern is KEY to limiting risk of future health issues. Be sure to follow POB for more info and tips on how to reduce your exposure to chemicals of concern!
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3 weeks ago

Protect Our Breasts

Misconceptions. Bias. Beliefs. We assume big strong men don’t care about personal care, but they do. And the products they choose can affect them as much as anyone. For men it seems PHTHALATES, often found in our personal care products hidden behind the term FRAGRANCE, are having a huge impact on male fertility - a 59% drop in the past forty years. November is for the Boys because the chemicals in our everyday products have to be stopped now for our future! We can change the marketplace by knowing how to make safer choices!
#november #phthalates #misconception #personalcare #selfcare #prevention #endocrinedisruptors
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1 month ago

Protect Our Breasts

Are you aware of breast cancer in Black women? Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer among Black women. While incidence of breast cancer has declined overall, incidence of breast cancer in Black women continues to rise.

Breast cancer, like many health conditions, is linked to a wide variety of risk factors, some of which are interconnected. Though there is limited research on health disparities of breast cancer, many of these differences may be in part from social, economic, and environmental factors, which primarily affect people of color, especially women of color. One of these risk factors includes chemicals in everyday products.Though it may be difficult to reduce some exposures, there are easy tips and switches that can be made to reduce your risk of a future breast cancer diagnosis.

To reduce your exposure, you can…
-Avoid toxic hair products, especially chemical hair straighteners.
-Bring your own safer neutralizing shampoo to the salon to avoid formaldehyde-releasing preservatives, endocrine disruptors, and/or carcinogens.
-Avoid nail polishes that include any of the toxic trio: dibutyl phthalate, formaldehyde, toluene.
-Reduce your use of products with added fragrance.
-Read labels closely and find safer alternatives using apps and websites like EWG’s Skin Deep Guide or Clearya.

Advocating for stronger regulation is also KEY to ensuring that companies are held accountable to reduce the risk of chemical exposure in everyday products. Follow POB on all social media for more information on chemicals of concern in everyday products and empowering tips to protect yourself from a future breast cancer diagnosis.
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